Discussion Circle

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SUNDAY DISCUSSION CIRCLE

10:15 - 11:15 AM - By Zoom Only (Temporarily)

       All are welcome for facilitated, fun, educational discussions on a variety of topics. We honor our covenant and Discussion Guidelines* to create a safe community for sharing our differing perspectives and learning from each other.  

      The Zoom room opens by 10:00 AM on Sundays to meet and greet each other.

      To get the Zoom meeting link, please send an email to info@firstuu.org, and if you would like to receive weekly reminder emails with the topics for this group and topics for the Wednesday Discussions by Zoom group, please let us know. 

 

UPCOMING TOPICS, FACILITATORS,

COVENANT, DISCUSSION GUIDELINES,

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST PRINCIPLES and SOURCES


Sunday Discussion, September 25
Travel to the Moon:
Are you excited about returning to the moon, and what are four reasons to go back to the moon?
Facilitator: James W

Resource: NPR article: “NASA is set to return to the moon. Here are 4 reasons to go back.”

Sunday, September 25
How do you feel about NASA returning to the moon? And: What are four reasons to go back to the moon? Resource: NPR article here.
Facilitator: James W

Sunday, October 2
What are your thoughts about supporting mandatory community service for all 18 year old US citizens, for the benefit and healing of our country?
Facilitator: Dean H

Sunday, October 9
How much should we let technology into our lives?
Facilitator: Kianna T

Sunday, October 16
Are Utilitarian ethics compatible with Unitarianism and Humanism? “Utilitarianism is an ethical theory that determines right from wrong by focusing on outcomes.”
Facilitator: Paul S

Sunday, October 23
What cities or communities do you feel most connected to, and why? We feel an intense emotional connection when in a location that has distinctive characteristics that appeal to us.” Reference: Place and Prosperity; How Cities Help Us To Connect and Innovate by William Fulton.
Facilitator: John H

Sunday, October 30
Why do you choose to be a part of a Unitarian Universalist community, and what do you want to get out of it and give to it? (By the Vision, Mission, Covenant Focus Group)
Facilitator: P.D. W or Steve B

COVENANT, DISCUSSION GUIDELINES, UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST PRINCIPLES and SOURCES

COVENANT

We, the Participants, Facilitators, Presenters and Zoom Hosts, welcome everyone, as together we create a safe, supportive and mindful community where we practice UU Principles and values by following group guidelines.

DISCUSSION GUIDELINES

 We covenant and aspire:

1.  To participate by listening with respect and curiosity, accepting and addressing our differing perspectives and biases with kindness and compassion in a learning community;

2.  To raise our actual hand and wait to be called on by the facilitator, limiting our sharing to two or three minutes; 

3.  To refrain from side conversations and interruptions, waiting until our turn to share our comments and questions with the whole group;

4.  On Zoom: To reduce distracting behaviors and noises on Zoom, (including when you are walking or moving around a lot, eating, or talking with someone), by (a) turning off our video screen, (b) muting our mics before and after our turn, and (c) refraining from using the Chat function to send questions or messages, except for sharing requested resource information;

5.  To share from our personal experience and beliefs, refraining from stereotyping, and respecting everyone’s privacy and confidentiality; 

6.  To accept that some concepts and issues might make us feel uncomfortable.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST PRINCIPLES AND SOURCES

Unitarian Universalist congregations affirm and promote seven Principles, which we hold as strong values and moral guides. We live out these Principles within a “living tradition” of wisdom and spirituality, drawn from sources as diverse as science, poetry, scripture, and personal experience.

As Rev. Barbara Wells ten Hove explains, “The Principles are not dogma or doctrine, but rather a guide for those of us who choose to join and participate in Unitarian Universalist religious communities.”

1st Principle:  The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
2nd Principle
:  Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
3rd Principle
:  Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
4th Principle
:  A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
5th Principle
:  The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
6th Principle
:  The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all;
7th Principle
:  Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

Proposed 8th Principle:  Journeying toward spiritual wholeness by working to build a diverse multicultural Beloved Community by our actions that accountably dismantle racism and other oppressions in ourselves and our institutions.

The seven Principles and six Sources of the Unitarian Universalist Association grew out of the grassroots of our communities, were affirmed democratically, and are part of who we are.

Unitarian Universalist congregations affirm and promote seven Principles, which we hold as strong values and moral guides. We live out these Principles within a “living tradition” of wisdom and spirituality, drawn from sources as diverse as science, poetry, scripture, and personal experience.

These are the six sources our congregations affirm and promote:

•        Direct experience of that transcending mystery and wonder, affirmed in all cultures, which moves us to a renewal of the spirit and an openness to the forces which create and uphold life;

•        Words and deeds of prophetic people which challenge us to confront powers and structures of evil with justice, compassion, and the transforming power of love;

•        Wisdom from the world's religions which inspires us in our ethical and spiritual life;

•        Jewish and Christian teachings which call us to respond to God's love by loving our neighbors as ourselves;

•        Humanist teachings which counsel us to heed the guidance of reason and the results of science, and warn us against idolatries of the mind and spirit;

•        Spiritual teachings of Earth-centered traditions which celebrate the sacred circle of life and instruct us to live in harmony with the rhythms of nature.

Rev. Kathleen Rolenz said, “Throughout history, we have moved to the rhythms of mystery and wonder, prophecy, wisdom, teachings from ancient and modern sources, and nature herself.”

For more information on Unitarian Universalism, see the UUA.org website.